• the still
  • the still
  • the still
  • the still

If you compare a picture of the still we used at the beginning of the 1960s (with Domenico Pagura, his mum Giovanna and a friend) with a picture of our currently used still, you will realise that nothing has changed in the Pagura distillery. Our still is certainly the oldest working still in Friuli Venezia Giulia – and is one of the oldest in Italy.
Over the last 50 years, the world has changed so dramatically that such an old functioning industrial plant is just astonishing. The secret of such success could well be the simplicity of the plant, which allows it to produce top quality grappa year after year.
Our goal is not to produce a refined spirit without personality, as one might produce in any other area of Italy or the world, no matter which raw products are being used: what we want to offer our faithful customers is a grappa expressing our region.
For us, it is very important that we create a well-balanced mix of alcohols, maintaining the volatile parts as they improve the bouquet of the grappa, and without completely eliminating the tails; and this will all leave a full-bodied and persistent distillate.
For this reason we still use a discontinuous still, enabling us to separate the different phases of the distillation; while for alcohol extraction we use small steam boilers to work on the pomace at a low temperature and pressure. An important role is also played by the fractionating column, which partially refines the steam released during the distillation.
All phases of the distillation process are manually performed by the grappa producer who, thanks to a hydrometer placed in the bell jar, can set the quantity of steam in the boilers and the amount of cooling water in the column according to the type of pomace. This patient work is monitored by a flow meter, this one being manufactured in 1923, by Siemens, in Berlin (and offered to Italy as part of the refund for war damages); since then, it has never stopped measuring how many litres of grappa are produced, with the utmost Teutonic precision.