• the industrial boom
  • the industrial boom
  • the industrial boom

After the Second World War, the huge stacks of wood used to kindle the fire for the distillation disappeared from the distillery’s courtyard. At that point, the still was improved with the addition of a naphtha-fired steam boiler.
Electric loaders replaced people in transporting the heavy pomace, and tractors took over from donkeys and horses.
The world was rapidly changing but Domenico, who was running the distillery with his mum Giovanna and his wife Anna, did not want to give up traditions, so he kept using the old distillation methods.

He asked two skilled coppersmiths from Conegliano, Zanbenedetti and Nogarol, to modernise the plant while keeping the “philosophy” of the discontinuous still.
The two craftsmen simply transformed the boilers from employing direct fire to indirect fire and replaced the fractionating column with a new one they made specifically for the distillery. The still manufactured at the beginning of the 1960s is the one we still use today.

We started producing grappa in a cattle shed and we now live in the computer age but, in spite of these momentous changes, parts of our history have amazingly stayed the same. In contrast to an obsession with innovation, we have never forgotten that with traditional skills we are still able to effect excellent results.