• the ageing process
  • the ageing process
  • the ageing process

Grappa is traditionally a transparent and colourless distillate that can be drunk as soon as it has been produced. Unlike other distillates, young grappa already has a rich flavour, something provided by its raw ingredients. In consequence, it is not necessary to age it to make it full-bodied – unlike what must happen with other distillates, such as Whisky and Cognac which, when young, are weak and characterless.
For this reason, grappa is normally stored in steel tanks which will keep its original properties almost unchanged.
Nevertheless, to satisfy our customers’ taste, some years ago our distillery began ageing some of our grappas. Aged grappa has a straw yellow colour, a colour released by the wood of the barrels, which are made from oak, acacia or cherry. The final result depends to a large extent on the length of the ageing process, which leads to the partial oxidation of some components; though a more important role is played by the barrels that are being used for the grappa. The broader the area over which the alcohol comes into contact with the wood and the younger the wood of the barrels, the greater the amount of tannins released into the ethyl alcohol.
This is the reason why in our distillery we use small barrels (maximum 3 hl), and we regularly replace the old ones.